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What are Prepared Statements?

Prepared Statements, also known as parameterized statements, is a database feature that allows the same or similar queries to be executed with more efficiency and greater security. It has also been a common Sugar platform feature request for some time.

A prepared statement looks something like this:

SELECT * FROM table WHERE id = ?

As you can see, a prepared statement is basically a SQL template that allows you to identify parameters that can be bound later. The database engine can parse, optimize, and cache this statement without executing it.

This reduces the overhead associated with parsing complex queries that are used frequently by applications like Sugar. For example, you can imagine that List View queries would benefit from prepared statements since they are often complex and executed each time a list is displayed, searched, filtered, or paginated. With prepared statements, the database will do less work each time one of these actions is repeated.

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In our last post we covered the basics of adding a custom chart layout. Today’s post will build on that example to cover some of the more advanced configurations that are possible using charts in Sugar.  Like the previous post, this is targeted at a beginner to intermediate skilled Sugar Developer who is interested in building custom charts.

Multiple Charts On the Same View

Previously we explored how to display a single chart on a view. Displaying more than a single chart on the view is also very easy too.

In order to add a second chart, you may be tempted to create another chart object in the initialize() method but that is not necessarily how Sugar Charts works.  The “chart” property in the view controller is a Chart factory. Chart factories will not affect how your view is rendered unless you do something with them. You can use the same factory’s call() method to construct the same style of chart multiple times.

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This post originally appeared on the SynoLab blog hosted by Synolia, an Elite SugarCRM Partner. Yann Bergès describes how you can use a relate filter with the Filter API. He also explores how Sugar does it as well as identifying a drawback to be considered when using this feature.

We all know the moment when you are roaming through source code to find something for a particular purpose and you come across that feature you didn’t expect but you absolutely want to test. This is how I came into the related link filter feature. What do I mean by related link filter? It is a derivative way to filter related data on a One-to-Many relationship by specifying a link name and a target field:

I want all Contacts filtered on their related Account with « Industry » value « Electronics » (use « one » side of the relationship)
I want all Accounts filtered on their related Contacts with « Title » value « President » (use « many » side of the relationship)

This is an advanced use of Sugar 7 Filter API, if you never used it before, have a look at this documentation for detailed information about how filters work:
– SugarCRM Cookbook – The School of REST – Part 3
– Sugar 7.8 Developer Guide – Architecture – Filters
Examples and tests have been made with a Sugar instance PRO 7.8.0.0

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This blog will be the first in a two part series on building Charts components for Sugar 7. This post is targeted at beginner to intermediate Sugar Developers who want to learn how to build their first Chart component.

This post assumes some basic knowledge of Sugar 7 development, Sugar 7 administration, JavaScript, and PHP.  This information should be useful to anyone who has an interest in Sugar 7 development.

The examples in this post were created on an out-of-the-box installation of Sugar Professional 7.8.0.0.  But this technique should work on any on-premise Sugar 7 instance.

Introduction

You may have noticed that a number of out of the box dashlets and views contain various fancy charts and visualizations.  This is possible because Sugar has a charting component build into it.  You can make use of this to display charts within your own custom dashlets, views or layouts.

In this post, we will focus on the “LineChart” type. There are other chart types that use different data formats and chart options but the general techniques covered here will work for all chart types.  These examples were implemented in a basic custom view but they will also work within dashlets.

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Here is another Francesca Shiekh guest post! She is a Sugar Developer from Wolfram Research.

We had the need to notify the assigned user when an email was received that was related to a Case record. To make our application more flexible we extended this concept to be reusable for email received that was related to any module. We then further broke out the notification functions to be reusable in other scenarios.

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Here is another guest post from Shijin Krishna from BHEA Technologies.

When a user logs into Sugar 7, an OAuth access token (with a 1 hour timeout by default) and a refresh token (with a 2 week timeout by default) are returned. When the access token expires, Sugar will automatically retrieve another access token as long as the refresh token is valid. This allows a user to use a Sugar browser tab for days on end without having to log back in.

Automated notification requests are made to the server on the user’s behalf at a default interval of every 5 minutes. These requests will allow the current session to remain active without actual user input. So tracking user activity by adjusting access token and refresh token expiry time or tracking network activity alone is not a good idea.

In this blog we are going to explore a way to track a user’s true idle time based on actual user interface activity. For example, one or more of clicks, typing, mouse movements etc. To track a user’s idle time we will use the JQuery IdleTimeout plugin.

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Sugar’s Single Page Architecture

Sugar relies on a single page architecture (SPA) for the Sidecar framework. But when a user navigates across the Sugar application (for example, when switching to another Sugar module), while the page is not refreshed, you will find that the majority of the HTML on the page is still re-rendered based upon the newly selected layout. This is done to not only change the style or configuration of the view (ex. List View → Record View) but also to update the context and configuration for the dashboard panel.

But not everything changes – the footer and header of the application remain fixed so they can serve as navigational anchors for Sugar users. This is an important use case but there are certainly others.

Telephony integration scenarios

A common set of integrations that are built for Sugar involve integrating a phone system for use by customer service organizations. This can vary from simple “click to dial” softphone functionality to full blown multi-channel call center capability where an agent handles phone, SMS, and e-mail inquiries at the same time.

A typical in-bound call process follows:

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